Grade 3 Additional Language Lesson Plan: Describing People

Lesson Plan 1: Listening and Speaking

Grade 3 Additional Language Lesson Plan: Describing People

Materials Needed:
– Flashcards with pictures of different people
– Chart paper and markers
– Audio recording device or mobile phone for recording students’ descriptions

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to describe people using simple adjectives.
2. Students will listen and respond to their peers’ descriptions.
3. Students will practice using complete sentences in oral descriptions.

Vocabulary:
1. Tall – having greater height than average
2. Short – having less height than average
3. Young – having lived for a short time
4. Old – having lived for a long time
5. Kind – having a friendly nature

Previous Learning:
Students have learned basic vocabulary for body parts and simple adjectives in previous lessons. They have also practiced speaking in short sentences.

Anticipated Challenges and Solutions:
Challenge: Difficulty in coming up with descriptive words
Solution: Provide a list of adjectives on the board as prompts
Challenge: Shyness or reluctance to speak
Solution: Group students in pairs to practise first

Lesson Activities

Beginning Activities (10% – 4 minutes):
1. Introduction: Greet students and share the learning objectives for the lesson.
2. Ice-breaker: Show flashcards to recap vocabulary of body parts and simple adjectives.

Middle Activities (80% – 32 minutes):
1. Direct Instruction (10 minutes):
– Teach students how to describe people using the target vocabulary.
– Model a description: “This is Peter. He is tall and kind. He has short brown hair.”

  1. Guided Practice (15 minutes):
  2. Divide students into pairs.
  3. Give each pair a flashcard with a picture of a person.
  4. Ask pairs to describe the person in the picture to each other using at least two adjectives.
  5. Monitor and assist as needed.
  6. Independent Practice (7 minutes):
  7. Have students volunteer to describe people from their own lives (family members, friends).
  8. Record these descriptions if possible for later review.

End Activities (10% – 4 minutes):
1. Review: Recap the key vocabulary and adjectives used in today’s lesson.
2. Exit Ticket: Ask each student to describe one person they know outside the class using at least two adjectives.

Assessment and Checks for Understanding:
– Monitor pair activities for correct use of adjectives.
– Listen to recorded descriptions for sentence structure and correct use of vocabulary.
– Exit ticket descriptions as a quick assessment.

Differentiation Strategies for Diverse Learners:
Scaffolding: Provide sentence starters for students needing extra help. (“This is . He/She is and ___.”)
Extension: Challenge advanced students to use additional adjectives and more complex sentences. (“This is my grandmother. She is very kind and always helps me with my homework.”)

Teaching Notes:
– Make sure to praise students for their effort and participation.
– Encourage a supportive and positive environment, especially for students who are shy.
– Use the recorded descriptions to give feedback in the next lesson.


Lesson Plan 2: Reading and Writing

Grade 3 Additional Language Lesson Plan: Writing Simple Sentences

Materials Needed:
– Short, simple story or text (handout or book)
– Whiteboard and markers
– Writing worksheets
– Pencils and erasers

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will practice reading a short, simple text.
2. Students will write simple sentences based on the text.
3. Students will use appropriate punctuation and capitalisation in their writing.

Vocabulary:
1. Sentence – a set of words that make complete sense
2. Punctuation – marks used in writing to separate sentences and clarify meaning
3. Capital letter – a large letter used at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns
4. Full stop – (.) a punctuation mark used at the end of a sentence
5. Read – to look at and comprehend the meaning of written words

Previous Learning:
Students have learned to identify and read basic sight words and have had practice in writing letters and short words.

Anticipated Challenges and Solutions:
Challenge: Difficulty reading longer words
Solution: Simplify text or provide additional phonetic guidance.
Challenge: Forgetting punctuation and capitalisation
Solution: Visual aids and reminders on the board

Lesson Activities

Beginning Activities (10% – 4 minutes):
1. Introduction: Briefly review the importance of using correct punctuation and capitalisation in writing.
2. Warm-up: Read a few sentences aloud and ask students to identify punctuation and capital letters.

Middle Activities (80% – 32 minutes):
1. Direct Instruction (10 minutes):
– Read the short story or text aloud to the class.
– Discuss the main idea of the text and key details.
– Highlight examples of punctuation and correct capitalisation within the text.

  1. Guided Reading Practice (10 minutes):
  2. Have students read the text along with you, then in small groups.
  3. Ask questions to ensure comprehension and monitor reading fluency.
  4. Writing Practice (12 minutes):
  5. Hand out the writing worksheets which include prompts based on the text.
  6. Encourage students to write simple sentences based on what they read, ensuring they use full stops and capital letters.
  7. Monitor and assist students as they write.

End Activities (10% – 4 minutes):
1. Review: Go over some student sentences on the board, correcting as a class for punctuation and capitalisation.
2. Exit Ticket: Students write one sentence about their favourite part of the story, using correct punctuation and capitalisation.

Assessment and Checks for Understanding:
– Monitor reading groups to assess comprehension.
– Review writing worksheets for proper sentence structure, punctuation, and capitalisation.
– Exit ticket sentences as a quick assessment.

Differentiation Strategies for Diverse Learners:
Scaffolding: Provide sentence frames for students who need more structure. (“My favourite part was because .”)
Extension: Challenge more advanced students to write a short paragraph summarising the story.

Teaching Notes:
– Encourage students to sound out difficult words and provide phonetic guidance.
– Reinforce the rules of punctuation and capitalisation throughout the lesson.
– Create a positive writing environment by displaying good examples of student work in the classroom.

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